(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Mathura A District Memoir"

SIYTHOLOGICAL DERIVATIONS*                                          77

the chum forming a prominent feature in all poetical descriptions of the local
scenery.   Take, for example, the following lines from the Harivansa, 3395 : 

iira irarwi    wgaRFfri \

is

" A fine country of many pasture-lands and well-nurtured people, full of
ropes for tethering cattle, resonant with the voice of the sputtering churn, and
flowing with butter-milk ; where the soil is ever moist with milky froth, and
the stick with its circling cord sputters merrily in the pail as the girls spin it
round."

And, again, In section 73 of the same poem 

" In homesteads gladdened hy the sputtering churn/'
In many cases a false analogy has suggested a mythological derivation.
Thus, all native* scholars see in Mathura an allusion to Madhu-matlian, a title of
Krishna. Again,, the word Baihan is still current in. some parts of India to
designate a pasture ground, an ^ & that sense has given a name to two exten-
sive parishes in Kosi ; but a? :::e term is not a familiar one thereabouts, a
legend was invented in expianiiiion, and it was said that here Bakrama ' sat
down' (bait/ten) to wait for Krishna. The myth was accepted ; a lake imme-
diately outside the village was styled Bal-bhadra kund, was furnished with a
handsome masonry ghat by Blip Ram*, the Katara of Barsana, and is now regard-
ed as positive proof of the popular etymology which connects the place with
Bakrama. Of Rup Ram, the K&tara, further mention will be made in connec-
tion with his birth-place, Barsana. There is scarcely a sacred site in the whole
of Braj which does not exhibit some ruinous record, in the shape of temple or
tank, of his unbounded wealth and liberality. His descendant in the fourth
degree, a worthy man, by name Lakshrnan Das, lives in a corner of one of his
ancestor's palaces and is dependent on charity for his daily bread. The present
owners of many of the villages which Rup Earn so munificently endowed
are the heirs of the Lala Bdbu, of whom also an account will be given
further on.